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Intracranial electric field measurements during TES. Identifying determinant factors of the electric field distribution

  • Alexander Opitz
    Affiliations
    Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA

    Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY, USA
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  • Erin Yeagle
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurosurgery, Hofstra North well School of Medicine, and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA
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  • Axel Thielscher
    Affiliations
    Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Denmark

    Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany

    Department of Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
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  • Charles Schroeder
    Affiliations
    Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA

    Departments of Neurological Surgery and Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, USA
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  • Ashesh Mehta
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurosurgery, Hofstra North well School of Medicine, and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA
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  • Michael P. Milham
    Affiliations
    Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA

    Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY, USA
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      Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) is an increasingly popular method to non-invasively modulate brain function. Recently, we have directly measured the electric field distribution in humans and non-human primates. However, in order to derive practical guidelines it is necessary to identify key factors that determine the electric field during TES in a given individual. Here, based on combined measurements and computational modeling, we identify determinant factors to be accounted for for a reliable application of TES.
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