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God locked you in the room, but left a window open: A case report of spinal cord stimulation in locked-in syndrome

Published:August 12, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2019.08.006
      Locked-in syndrome (LIS), caused by severe damage to the pons, is a serious neurological condition of movement deficiency, characterized by quadriplegia and aphonia. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS), the most common neuromodulation therapy, has recently been shown to restore walking in patients with spinal cord injury [
      • Wagner F.B.
      • Mignardot J.B.
      • Le Goff-Mignardot C.G.
      • et al.
      Targeted neurotechnology restores walking in humans with spinal cord injury.
      ]. The possibility of SCS treatment in LIS is still unclear. We reported the first application of cervical SCS in a classic LIS patient with encouraging outcomes.
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